/etc/debconf.conf

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  • DevynCJohnson
    DevynCJohnson
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    On Ubuntu (Linux) -

    # This is the main config file for debconf. It tells debconf where to
    # store data. The format of this file is a set of stanzas. Each stanza
    # except the first sets up a database for debconf to use. For details, see
    # debconf.conf(5) (in the debconf-doc package).
    #
    # So first things first. This first stanza gives the names of two databases.
    
    # Debconf will use this database to store the data you enter into it,
    # and some other dynamic data.
    Config: configdb
    # Debconf will use this database to store static template data.
    Templates: templatedb
    
    # World-readable, and accepts everything but passwords.
    Name: config
    Driver: File
    Mode: 644
    Reject-Type: password
    Filename: /var/cache/debconf/config.dat
    
    # Not world readable (the default), and accepts only passwords.
    Name: passwords
    Driver: File
    Mode: 600
    Backup: false
    Required: false
    Accept-Type: password
    Filename: /var/cache/debconf/passwords.dat
    
    # Set up the configdb database. By default, it consists of a stack of two
    # databases, one to hold passwords and one for everything else.
    Name: configdb
    Driver: Stack
    Stack: config, passwords
    
    # Set up the templatedb database, which is a single flat text file
    # by default.
    Name: templatedb
    Driver: File
    Mode: 644
    Filename: /var/cache/debconf/templates.dat
    
    # Well that was pretty straightforward, and it will be enough for most
    # people's needs, but debconf's database drivers can be used to do much
    # more interesting things. For example, suppose you want to use config
    # data from another host, which is mounted over nfs or perhaps the database
    # is accessed via LDAP. You don't want to write to the remote debconf database,
    # just read from it, so you still need a local database for local changes.
    #
    # A remote NFS mounted database, read-only. It is optional; if debconf
    # fails to use it it will not abort.
    #Name: remotedb
    #Driver: DirTree
    #Directory: /mnt/otherhost/var/cache/debconf/config
    #Readonly: true
    #Required: false
    #
    # A remote LDAP database. It is also read-only. The password is really
    # only necessary if the database is not accessible anonymously.
    # Option KeyByKey instructs the backend to retrieve keys from the LDAP
    # server individually (when they are requested), instead of loading all
    # keys at startup. The default is 0, and should only be enabled if you
    # want to track accesses to individual keys on the LDAP server side.
    #Name: remotedb
    #Driver: LDAP
    #Server: remotehost
    #BaseDN: cn=debconf,dc=domain,dc=com
    #BindDN: uid=admin,dc=domain,dc=com
    #BindPasswd: secret
    #KeyByKey: 0
    #
    # A stack consisting of two databases. Values will be read from
    # the first database in the stack to contain a value. In this example,
    # writes always go to the first database.
    #Name: fulldb
    #Driver: Stack
    #Stack: configdb, remotedb
    #
    # In this example, we'd use Config: fulldb at the top of the file
    # to make it use the combination of the databases.
    #
    # Even more complex and interesting setups are possible, see the
    # debconf.conf(5) page for details.

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